Soal Test Wawasan Bahasa Inggris

Soal Test Wawasan Bahasa Inggris

Jumlah Soal : 100 Soal

Durasi : 60 menit

Soal Tes Potensi Bahasa Inggris

Soal Tes Potensi Akademik Bahasa Inggris

Jumlah Soal : 100 Soal

Waktu Mengerjakan : 60 Menit

1 / 100

“With a dawn just moment away and … “ The antonym of the word dawn is …

2 / 100

meteorology (n)

3 / 100

unadulterated (adj)

4 / 100

For the investor who.... money, silver orn bonds are good option.

5 / 100

laissez-faire (phr)

6 / 100

life span (phr)

7 / 100

accomplished (adj)

8 / 100

As soon as th board of election promulgates the list of candidates, a ballot is prepared.

9 / 100

harbor (v)

10 / 100

assiduous (adj)

11 / 100

incubation (n)

12 / 100

Spartan (adj)

13 / 100

placate (v)

14 / 100

After the security guard’s performance was evaluated, management decides to dismiss her and asked her to turn in her uniform.

15 / 100

reveal

16 / 100

molecule (n)

17 / 100

I counted twenty students at ..., the others were all members of the teaching staff.

18 / 100

fertile (adj)

19 / 100

atmosphere (n)

20 / 100

jaundiced (adj)

21 / 100

sociology (n)

22 / 100

Shrimping in Mississippi's tidal areas is not allowed during the summer

months.

23 / 100

double-edged sword

(id, n/adj)

24 / 100

elicit

25 / 100

ravenous (adj)

26 / 100

……….of fungi is a branch of biology known as mycology.

27 / 100

apoplectic (adj)

28 / 100

A primary exception to the steady abandonment of windmills was their resurgence in rural areas for pumping water from wells.

29 / 100

keen (adj)

30 / 100

garage (n)

31 / 100

I went shopping and spent …….. money.

32 / 100

The composition of heavenly bodies can be discovered by analyzing the light

they emit.

33 / 100

A trip to Bali should ...

34 / 100

extinct (adj)

35 / 100

evolved (adj)

36 / 100

Sometimes items are put on sale because they have imperfections on them.

37 / 100

rugged (adj)

38 / 100

indigenous (adj)

39 / 100

rate (v)

40 / 100

She … on airplane many times.

41 / 100

Last year we ……. some unforgetable shows in California that

everyone forgot.

42 / 100

Once, there was a kingdom in Priangan Land. Lived a happy family. They were a father in form of dog,his name is Tumang, a mother which was called is Dayang Sumbi, and a child which was called Sangkuriang.

One day, Dayang Sumbi asked her son to go hunting with his lovely dog, Tumang. After hunting all day, Sangkuriang began desperate and worried because he hunted no deer. Then he thought to shot his own dog. Then he took the dog liver and carried home.

Soon Dayang Sumbi found out that it was not deer lever but Tumang's, his own dog. So, She was very angry and hit Sangkuriang's head. In that incident, Sangkuriang got wounded and scar then cast away from their home.

Years go bye, Sangkuriang had travel many places and finally arrived at a village. He met a beautiful woman and felt in love with her. When they were discussing their wedding plans, The woman looked at the wound in Sangkuriang's head. It matched to her son's wound who had left severall years earlier. Soon she realized that she felt in love with her own son.

She couldn't marry him but how to say it. Then, she found the way. She needed a lake and a boat for celebrating their wedding day. Sangkuriang had to make them in one night. He built a lake. With a dawn just moment away and the boat was almost complete. Dayang Sumbi had to stop it. Then, she lit up the eastern horizon with flashes of light. It made the cock crowed for a new day.

Sangkuriang failed to marry her. She was very angry and kicked the boat. It felt over and became the mountain of Tangkuban Perahu Bandung.

What was the reason that Dayang Sumbi couldn’t marry Sangkuriang?

43 / 100

secession (n)

44 / 100

resolute

45 / 100

enigmatic (adj)

46 / 100

These are amazing advances, but while all this scientific back-slapping is going on, the dark cloud on the horizon is the emerging Ebola epidemic in West Africa and the warning undercurrent that comes with it. At the time of writing at least 7000 people have been infected and half of those have died. The CDC in America also estimate that, because the level of reporting is so poor, the numbers can, in all likelihood , be doubled or even tripled. And because the rates of infection appear to be growing exponentially, tens of thousands, or even millions , might ultimately be affected.

To put the scale of the present situation into perspective, since the first recorded case of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo 38 years ago there have been fewer than 2,500 deaths documented in total. So this single present outbreak is already three times larger than the entire Ebola death toll ever. It’s also no longer just an African problem. The West has had its own wake-up call this week as the US and Spain, countries previously regarded as immune to the threat thanks to modern Medicine , have reported imported cases of the condition and , despite strict infection-control guidelines and practices, onward transmissions of Ebola on their home soil.

What is remarkable though is that, while Ebola is terrifying and dramatic in its impact when it causes an outbreak, it appears to be a relatively easy agent to fight. Experimental vaccines tested so far on animals have been impressively effective, protecting against even injection of the live Ebola virus. But because they are at a test stage, these agents, which will be critical if we’re to nip this outbreak in the bud,are nowhere near ready for mass production. Trials are only now getting underway of human versions of the vaccines in Oxford , UK, and the US. “Way too late,” many are saying, to prevent the inevitable.

So why is it that, nearly 40 years after Ebola first surfaced , the world finds itself in a state of panic, and up to ten thousand people are dead, owing to a bug that’s probably preventable thanks to scientific research done decades ago? The answer is that Ebola was regarded as someone else’s problem. It was a tropical disease of low importance and (presumedto be) constrained by geography and climate to a part of the world that held little economic interest to the rest of us. But therein lies a salutary lesson: because if even a tiny fraction - less than 1% - of what the present outbreak is now costing the world in terms of lost productivity, humanitarian aid and human lives lost had been spent 20 years ago to develop an Ebola vaccine, we probably wouldn’t be in this position now. It’s easy to dismiss tropical diseases as an issue that won’t affect the West, but the present situation is a warning shot across our bows that we ignore at our peril. (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/)

The assumption the author has about the West is ...

47 / 100

Read the passage below carefully and then answer the questions that follow.

(1) The Industrial Revolution was essentially a rapid change in the method of production

of material goods. (2) Products once made by hand were now able to be produced by machine or

by chemical processes.

(3) The Industrial Revolution transformed Western society, creating an international capitalist economy, urbanization, labor reforms, public education, and labor specialization.

(4) While the pace of change during the Industrial Revolution was indeed very rapid, the

Industrial Revolution itself stretched over a rather long period of time—from the mid-1700s

through World War I (1914).

(5) In the first century of the Industrial Revolution, the country undergoing the most dramatic change was England.

(6) After 1850, the Industrial Revolution spread rapidly throughout Europe.

(7) Several key discoveries and inventions enabled the Industrial Revolution to take place.

(8) These included machines and tools like the cotton gin, the radio, the circular saw, the cylindrical

press, and the steam engine.

(9) Cement, dynamite, and aluminum were invented, as were the bleaching and papermaking processes.

The Industrial Revolution took place during which years?

48 / 100

The typical symphony orchestra has evolved gradually since the late eighteenth century.

49 / 100

suffice it to say (phr)

50 / 100

Rina: “Andi, will you close the windows? please. I’m busy right now.”
Andi: “I’m busy my self, but I ………anyhow.”

51 / 100

allude to (v)

52 / 100

vigorous

53 / 100

appealing

54 / 100

The song ……. out in 1980, arguably the dawn of one of the

greatest musical decades every known to mankind.

55 / 100

fragile

56 / 100

jurisdiction (n)

57 / 100

mass consumption (phr)

58 / 100

This is a list of … ……… people to be measured and verified, living

and dead, from 1835 to the present.

59 / 100

amenity

60 / 100

moreover (adv)

61 / 100

Passage 1

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair—better known to its participants

and to history simply as “Woodstock”—should have been a colossal failure.

Just a month prior to its August 15, 1969 opening, the council of

Wallkill, New York, informed the fair’s organizers that it was withdrawing

its permission to hold the festival.

Amazingly, the organizers found a new site, a large field in Woodstock,

New York, owned by a local dairy farmer. Word spread to the public

of the fair’s new location. The event drew a larger audience than the

organizers had expected.

On the first day of the fair, crowd estimates of  30,000 kept rising; traffic

jams blocked most roads leading to the area

.

Some musicians could not reach the site to appear at their scheduled times.

In addition, fences that were supposed to facilitate ticket collection never

materialized, so the organizers abandoned all attempts at taking tickets.

But that was not all: as the large crowd gathered, so did summer

storm clouds. It started raining on opening night and continued for much

of the three-day event. To deal with the crowd, which reached an esti

mated 500,000 by the third day, helicopters flew in food, doctors, and

medical supplies

.

Despite all of its problems, the festival featured some of the greatest

musicians of the 1960s, including Janis Joplin; Joan Baez; Crosby,

Stills, Nash, and Young; Sly and the Family Stone; Creedence Clearwater

Revival; and Jimi Hendrix. Today many people think of Woodstock

not only as a milestone for rock music but as the defining moment

for an entire generation.

The phrase defining moment in paragraph 4 could best be

replaced by which word or phrase?

62 / 100

expiration (n)

63 / 100

traditional

64 / 100

Passage 1

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair—better known to its participants

and to history simply as “Woodstock”—should have been a colossal failure.

Just a month prior to its August 15, 1969 opening, the council of

Wallkill, New York, informed the fair’s organizers that it was withdrawing

its permission to hold the festival.

Amazingly, the organizers found a new site, a large field in Woodstock,

New York, owned by a local dairy farmer. Word spread to the public

of the fair’s new location. The event drew a larger audience than the

organizers had expected.

On the first day of the fair, crowd estimates of  30,000 kept rising; traffic

jams blocked most roads leading to the area

.

Some musicians could not reach the site to appear at their scheduled times.

In addition, fences that were supposed to facilitate ticket collection never

materialized, so the organizers abandoned all attempts at taking tickets.

But that was not all: as the large crowd gathered, so did summer

storm clouds. It started raining on opening night and continued for much

of the three-day event. To deal with the crowd, which reached an esti

mated 500,000 by the third day, helicopters flew in food, doctors, and

medical supplies

.

Despite all of its problems, the festival featured some of the greatest

musicians of the 1960s, including Janis Joplin; Joan Baez; Crosby,

Stills, Nash, and Young; Sly and the Family Stone; Creedence Clearwater

Revival; and Jimi Hendrix. Today many people think of Woodstock

not only as a milestone for rock music but as the defining moment

for an entire generation.

The main idea of this passage is best expressed in which

sentence?

65 / 100

lasting

66 / 100

uniform

67 / 100

Why so many people die from this illness __________ unknown, but

researchers have learned much about the source of the problem.

68 / 100

advent of (phr)

69 / 100

One of the most striking aspects of Indian cultures was the production of ceremonial costumes and ornaments worn during religious rituals.

70 / 100

substitute

71 / 100

Mom: “When did you realize you had lost your purse?“
Me: “When I … ,one to pay the conductor”

72 / 100

Historical record reveal that Jefferson relterated his ideas about a meritocracy.

73 / 100

whereby (conj)

74 / 100

boom (n)

75 / 100

vulnerable (adj)

76 / 100

You should get someone to ... the house before you  decide to buy it.

77 / 100

The unique nature of viruses requires careful study to determine how they develop in host cells.

78 / 100

ratify (v)

79 / 100

impecunious (adj)

80 / 100

case in point (phr)

81 / 100

Emmanuel wishes that he ______ never moved from his old neighborhood.

82 / 100

The manager was very worried because his production figures were ...

83 / 100

dissimilar (adj)

84 / 100

Index

Cover story.... 3 - 13

Economy and Business...... 25-31

Editorial............................... 56

Entertainment................ 41 - 46

National News............. 14 - 24

Sport............... 47 - 55

World News...... 32 - 40

One which of the pags of the magazine would one probably find a list of the current trading pices of stock and bonds?

85 / 100

... Miss Clara nor Mr Elang will attend the annual workshop next Monday

86 / 100

eclectic

87 / 100

In 1985, the Coca-Cola Company altered the secret formula of the drink's

ingredients.

88 / 100

The vital laws of geologic succession were not fully understood until the end of the eighteenth century.

89 / 100

on top of that (phr)

90 / 100

These are amazing advances, but while all this scientific back-slapping is going on, the dark cloud on the horizon is the emerging Ebola epidemic in West Africa and the warning undercurrent that comes with it. At the time of writing at least 7000 people have been infected and half of those have died. The CDC in America also estimate that, because the level of reporting is so poor, the numbers can, in all likelihood , be doubled or even tripled. And because the rates of infection appear to be growing exponentially, tens of thousands, or even millions , might ultimately be affected.

To put the scale of the present situation into perspective, since the first recorded case of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo 38 years ago there have been fewer than 2,500 deaths documented in total. So this single present outbreak is already three times larger than the entire Ebola death toll ever. It’s also no longer just an African problem. The West has had its own wake-up call this week as the US and Spain, countries previously regarded as immune to the threat thanks to modern Medicine , have reported imported cases of the condition and , despite strict infection-control guidelines and practices, onward transmissions of Ebola on their home soil.

What is remarkable though is that, while Ebola is terrifying and dramatic in its impact when it causes an outbreak, it appears to be a relatively easy agent to fight. Experimental vaccines tested so far on animals have been impressively effective, protecting against even injection of the live Ebola virus. But because they are at a test stage, these agents, which will be critical if we’re to nip this outbreak in the bud,are nowhere near ready for mass production. Trials are only now getting underway of human versions of the vaccines in Oxford , UK, and the US. “Way too late,” many are saying, to prevent the inevitable.

So why is it that, nearly 40 years after Ebola first surfaced , the world finds itself in a state of panic, and up to ten thousand people are dead, owing to a bug that’s probably preventable thanks to scientific research done decades ago? The answer is that Ebola was regarded as someone else’s problem. It was a tropical disease of low importance and (presumedto be) constrained by geography and climate to a part of the world that held little economic interest to the rest of us. But therein lies a salutary lesson: because if even a tiny fraction - less than 1% - of what the present outbreak is now costing the world in terms of lost productivity, humanitarian aid and human lives lost had been spent 20 years ago to develop an Ebola vaccine, we probably wouldn’t be in this position now. It’s easy to dismiss tropical diseases as an issue that won’t affect the West, but the present situation is a warning shot across our bows that we ignore at our peril. (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/)

Which of the following is most relevant with the idea of Ebola outbreak described in the passage?

91 / 100

incorporate (v)

92 / 100

owing to the fact that (adv)

93 / 100

The man was in __________ health that the family began to consider whether he could continue to live in his home.

94 / 100

repeal (v)

95 / 100

reign (v)

96 / 100

Passage 1

 

The Woodstock Music and Art Fair—better known to its participants

and to history simply as “Woodstock”—should have been a colossal failure.

Just a month prior to its August 15, 1969 opening, the council of

Wallkill, New York, informed the fair’s organizers that it was withdrawing

its permission to hold the festival.

Amazingly, the organizers found a new site, a large field in Woodstock,

New York, owned by a local dairy farmer. Word spread to the public

of the fair’s new location. The event drew a larger audience than the

organizers had expected.

On the first day of the fair, crowd estimates of  30,000 kept rising; traffic

jams blocked most roads leading to the area

.

Some musicians could not reach the site to appear at their scheduled times.

In addition, fences that were supposed to facilitate ticket collection never

materialized, so the organizers abandoned all attempts at taking tickets.

But that was not all: as the large crowd gathered, so did summer

storm clouds. It started raining on opening night and continued for much

of the three-day event. To deal with the crowd, which reached an esti

mated 500,000 by the third day, helicopters flew in food, doctors, and

medical supplies

.

Despite all of its problems, the festival featured some of the greatest

musicians of the 1960s, including Janis Joplin; Joan Baez; Crosby,

Stills, Nash, and Young; Sly and the Family Stone; Creedence Clearwater

Revival; and Jimi Hendrix. Today many people think of Woodstock

not only as a milestone for rock music but as the defining moment

for an entire generation.

Where in the passage does the author describe the weather

conditions during the event?

97 / 100

206. American English phonetics. Fall. 5 hours. Three lectures, two laboratoryperiods. Prerequisite; English 205, Linguistics 210 or equivalent. A study of American English pronounciation, designed for advanced international students.

Professor Ayers

From this course description, we know that the class meets .....

98 / 100

A major shift in propulsion technology during the postwar period caused the world to adopt jet propulsion as the power source for military and passenger aircraft.

99 / 100

restore

100 / 100

eventually

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